Photo By Peter Watts
Ironworkers Memorial Bridge
 
Share

Search for Hotels in Vancouver





Ironworkers Memorial Bridge - PHOTOGRAPHER COMMENT

Virtual tour image taken from the top of Ironworkers Memorial Bridge in Vancouver. This view was taken from the eastern side of the road, giving a view up into the reaches of the Burrard inlet. Just next to the bridge is a railway bridge which has a moveable central platform that can raised to allow large cargo ships access to the inner harbour.

Ironworkers Memorial Bridge - FURTHER INFORMATION

Ironworkers Memorial Bridge - Vancouver visitor guide showing a virtual tour of 'Ironworkers Memorial Bridge' linked to an interactive map with local and travel information. 360° panoramas from British Columbia.

Ironworkers Memorial Bridge crosses a narrow section of the Burrard Inlet, connecting Vancouver with North Vancouver. The bridge is close to New Brighton Park on the southern side and the Phibbs Exchange in North Vancouver. The full name of the bridge is the Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing and it is also referred to as Second Narrows Bridge.

The bridge was built between 1957-1960 next to the former Second Narrows Bridge, which is now used exclusively for rail traffic. The new road-bridge opened on August 25, 1960 at the cost of $15M. It is 1,292m long with a 335m wide central span and part of the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 1).

While principally a road bridge, it is possible to walk / cycle over on both sides, which gives great views either down the Burrard Inlet or over Downtown Vancouver.

Renaming the Bridge

During construction in 1958, five spans of the bridge collapsed as a crane extended to join the two chords of the unfinished bridge. In the accident 79 workers plunged 30m into the waters below. Eighteen of them drowned, as did one of the rescue divers looking for bodies. In 1994 the bridge was renamed the Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing in memory of these 19 workers as well as an additional four who died during the construction. The event was also noted by Stompin' Tom Connors who wrote The Bridge Came Tumbling Down that featured on his 1972 album My Stompin' Grounds.

TRAVEL DIRECTIONS AND GETTING THERE

Bus: The 28, 130, 209, 210, 211 and 214 buses all cross the bridge. The nearest stops are the Phibbs Exchange (all buses) in North Vancouver and stops on McGill St / Renfrew St (209, 210, 211 and 214) or Cassiar St at Triumph St (28, 130) in Vancouver.



Recent Local Panoramas

Mary Fox Pottery
Mary Fox Pottery / Ladysmith
Stump Lake in Alice Lake Provincial Park
Stump Lake in Alice Lake Provincial Park / Squamish
Cheekye River near Squamsih
Cheekye River near Squamsih / Squamish
Fawn Lake in Alice Lake Provincial Park
Fawn Lake in Alice Lake Provincial Park / Squamish
Four Lakes Trail in Alice Lake Provincial Park
Four Lakes Trail in Alice Lake Provincial Park / Squamish
Alice Lake Provincial Park
Alice Lake Provincial Park / Squamish
Buntzen Lake Forest on Trail
Buntzen Lake Forest on Trail / Port Moody
Buntzen Lake Viewpoint
Buntzen Lake Viewpoint / Port Moody



Real Time Web Analytics